How Do I Map a Drive Network Share Using the Linux Terminal?

Still getting used to Linux, and the GUI is great. I have Ubuntu 10 and I can go to Network and see the Windows network. Then double clicking this gets me to the drives that are shared. Then when I go back to the terminal and use:

cd ~/.gvfs

I can see the mapped drives. But it would be nice if I could this without all the mouse clicking. So how do I map network drives in the terminal, something akin to net use for Windows.

EDIT: Not sure what happened, but this is what I did to get it to work. I created the directory for the share in /media and then ran:

sudo mount -t cifs -o username=nicorellius //server/share/ /media/share

and it said command couldn’t be found. So i thought I would go ahead and use smbfs so I ran:

sudo apt-get install smbfs

I tried the command suggested with smbfs instead of cifs and that didn’t work either. So I tried again and then the next time I ran:

sudo mount -t cifs -o username=nicorellius //server/share/ /media/share

it worked and I could navigate to the directory with cd.

Disable quota for a Linux user or group on the shell

Linux user quotas can be edited with the commands edquota or setquota on the shell. While edquota opens the quota settings in a editor like vim, setquota allows you to specify the quota settings on the commandline.
Example for disabling the quota for the user “testuser”:
setquota -u testuser 0 0 0 0 -a
Example for disabling quota for the group “testgroup”:
setquota -g testgroup 0 0 0 0 -a

MySQL Commands

his is a list of handy MySQL commands that I use time and time again. At the bottom are statements, clauses, and functions you can use in MySQL. Below that are PHP and Perl API functions you can use to interface with MySQL. To use those you will need to build PHP with MySQL functionality. To use MySQL with Perl you will need to use the Perl modules DBI and DBD::mysql.

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